Exhibitor listing

Chase Contemporary

Chase Contemporary
231 10th Avenue
New York City, New York 10011
United States
T  212.337.3203

E-mail address : info@chasecontemporary.com
Website :http://www.chasecontemporary.com

ABOUT

Exhibitor's Artists:

  • Ole Aakjær  (+)

    Biography : Ole Aakjær has been drawing and painting since he was able to hold a pencil. Originally, Aakjær’s dream was to work with the cartoon medium. He was especially fascinated by the experimental part of the cartoon scene that unfolded in the 1980s. His greatest role models were Jean Giraud (Moebius), Milo Manara, Enki Bilal, etc. Art has always been his inspiration; his way of inhaling life and understanding himself. He does his paintings in a modern atelier with room for the large formats, lots of light and a view of the beautiful Vejle Inlet. He has won a wide range of competitions and distinctions and gained recognition as an innovator, designer and especially as an artist, and he can look back at a number (30 in a row) of sold out exhibitions at some of the leading art galleries in Denmark and abroad. His works are always performed in watercolor and ink on paper – often in very large formats - women painted with great psychological empathy, unique colors and highly storytelling tattoos. Previously, he has experimented with acrylic and oil but it is on the turbulent ocean of the watercolor that he really excels.

    Artist's Objects:

    •  Ole Aakjær - Strong Woman Eating a Man

      Strong Woman Eating a Man

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  • Shepard Fairey  (+)

    Biography : Expanding on the legacies of artists such as Keith Haring and Andy Warhol, Shepard Fairey’s practice disrupts the distinction between fine and commercial art. A major artist of the street art movement, Fairey rose to prominence in the early 1990s through the dispersion of posters, stickers, and murals, related to his Obey Giant campaign, which yielded an international cultural phenomenon. Fairey’s iconic poster of President Barack Obama was adopted as the official emblem associated with the presidential campaign and encapsulates a number of recurring concerns in the artist’s work, including propaganda, portraiture, and political power.

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  • Damien Hirst  (+)

    Biography : Damien Hirst first came to public attention in London in 1988 when he conceived and curated "Freeze," an exhibition in a disused warehouse that showed his work and that of his friends and fellow students at Goldsmiths College. In the nearly quarter of a century since that pivotal show (which would come to define the Young British Artists), Hirst has become one of the most influential artists of his generation. His groundbreaking works include The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living (1991), a shark in formaldehyde; Mother and Child Divided (1993) a four-part sculpture of a bisected cow and calf; and For the Love of God (2007), a human skull studded with 8,601 diamonds. In addition to his installations and sculptures, Hirst’s Spot paintings and Butterfly paintings have become universally recognized.

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  • Chuck Hoberman  (+)

    Biography : Chuck Hoberman, internationally known for his transformable structures, seamlessly fuses the disciplines of art, architecture and engineering, Through his products, patents, and structures, Hoberman demonstrates how objects can be foldable, retractable, or shape-shifting. He is the founder of Hoberman Associates, a multidisciplinary practice that utilizes transformable principles for a wide range of applications including dynamic architecture, transformable stage sets, consumer products, deployable shelters and structures for aerospace. His art has been exhibited around the world on many occasions over the last 20 years. Examples of his commissioned work include the transforming video screen for the U2 360° world tour (2009-2011), the Hoberman Arch in Salt Lake City, installed at Medals Plaza for the Winter Olympic Games (2002), a retractable dome for the World’s Fair in Hanover, Germany (2000), and ‘Emergent Surface’ (2008) shown at The Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 2008, partnering with the global engineering firm, Buro Happold, Hoberman formed the Adaptive Building Initiative (ABI) to develop adaptive technologies for the built environment. ABI has since built dynamic facades and operable roofs in the US, Japan and the Mideast. In 2009, He joined Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering as a Visiting Scholar where he works alongside researchers in biology, materials science and robotics. The goal of these collaborations is to develop bioinspired materials and devices that emulate the way nature builds. Hoberman holds over twenty patents for his transformable inventions, and has won numerous awards for his designs.

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  • Roy Lichtenstein  (+)

    Biography : When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

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  • Raphael Mazzucco  (+)

    Biography : Raphael Mazzucco is a Canadian photographer of art, music, and fashion, whose work has earned him international acclaim. Renowned soccer player–turned fashion photographer, Mazzucco specializes in multifaceted, female-centric images that reflect his various creative interests and strengths. The point of departure for Mazzucco in many of his resin-encased photographs is the female figure and explorations in femininity. He then blends pieces of images, foliage and other ephemera from nature into large containers of resin, and this lush mixture eventually makes its way onto the large-format photographs as artfully-applied swaths of color and texture. As Mazzucco describes his dynamic and unpredictable technique, “I look for structure in chaos and it always ends up appearing but never as expected.” As a fashion photographer, Mazzucco’s images have graced the covers of publications from Vogue to the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, and his editorial fashion imagery and celebrity portraiture have appeared in numerous magazines, including L’Official, French & Italian Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Marie Claire, Playboy, and Vanity Fair. Additionally, Mazzucco has been profiled by several leading outlets, such as The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, The New York Times Style Section, and Paris Vogue, to name a few. His multimedia photography is featured in the private collections of well-known names from Tommy Hilfiger to Rhianna, as well as fellow artists Peter Beard and Damien Hirst.

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  • RETNA  (+)

    Biography : The street and studio artist Retna, born Marquis Lewis, picked his moniker from the lyrics of a Wu Tang song that resonated with him in his youth. Retna explains that he was inspired to pursue art after seeing graffiti on the freeway, and his practice now includes street art and painting on canvas. Retna has become known for his long and geometric script, which he developed while looking towards Egyptian and Native American traditional symbols. Though his marks resemble the calligraphy of multiple cultures (and he maintains that he composes his works in English and Spanish), the writing does not belong to a particular language. Retna explains, “I want my text to feel universal. I want people from different cultures to all find some similarity in it—whether they can read it or not.”

    Artist's Objects:

    • RETNA RETNA - Untitled

      Untitled

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  • Andy Warhol  (+)

    Biography : Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

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Other Artists represented by the Gallery:


Untitled - RETNA RETNA

RETNA

Untitled

2011. Acrylic on canvas. 96 x 69".

Strong Woman Eating a Man -  Ole Aakjær

Ole Aakjær

Strong Woman Eating a Man

2018. Watercolor on paper. 68 1/10 x 50".